Neurosurgery 2018-02-01T20:55:37+03:00

Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, or neurological surgery, is the medical specialty concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, surgical treatment, and rehabilitation of disorders which affect any portion of the nervous system including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, and extra-cranial cerebrovascular system.

The Vienesse School of Neurology enjoys a long and well established European tradition and development and high expertise in minimally invasive surgery, intraoperative MRI, brain awake surgery, radiosurgery and deep brain stiulation.

Meningioma

A meningioma is a tumor that forms on membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord just inside the skull.

Specifically, the tumor forms on the three layers of membranes that are called meninges.

These tumors are often slow-growing. As many as 90% are benign (not cancerous).

Most meningiomas occur in the brain. But they can also grow on parts of the spinal cord. Often, meningiomas cause no symptoms and require no immediate treatment. But the growth of benign meningiomas can cause serious problems. In some cases, such growth can be fatal. Meningiomas are the most common type of tumor that originates in the central nervous system. They occur more often in women than in men. Some meningiomas are classified as atypical. These are not considered either benign or malignant (cancerous). But they may become malignant.

A small number of meningiomas are cancerous. They tend to grow quickly. They also can spread to other parts of the brain and beyond, often to the lungs.

Brain tumors

Tumors are clumps of cells that grow abnormally from normal tissue. Some brain tumors are noncancerous, or benign. Others are cancerous. They may start in the brain, or they may spread from elsewhere in the body (metastatic). They may grow quickly or they may remain stable.

Treatment for a brain tumors differs depending on several factors: a person’s age, general health, and the size, location, and type of tumor.

You and your loved ones will have many questions about brain tumors, the treatment, side effects, and the long-term outlook. Your health care team is the best source of this information. Don’t hesitate to ask.

Treatment of brain tumors is usually complex. Most treatment plans involve several consulting doctors. The team of doctors includes neurosurgeons (specialists in the brain and nervous system), oncologists, radiation oncologists (doctors who practice radiation therapy), and, of course, your primary health care provider. Your team may also include a dietitian, a social worker, a physical therapist, and, possibly, other specialists such as a neurologist.

The treatment protocols vary widely according to the location of the tumor, its size and type, your age, and any additional medical problems that you may have.

The most widely used treatments are surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. In most cases, more than one of these is used.

Cervical Disc Herniation

The bones (vertebrae) that form the spine camera.gif in your back are cushioned by round, flat discs. When these discs are healthy, they act as shock absorbers for the spine and keep the spine flexible. If they become damaged, they may bulge abnormally or break open (rupture), in what is called a herniated or slipped disc. Herniated discs can occur in any part of the spine, but they are most common in the neck (cervical) and lower back (lumbar) spine. The seven vertebrae between the head and the chest make up the cervical spine.

Cervical Disc Herniation causes

A herniated disc usually is caused by wear and tear of the disc (also called disc degeneration). As we age, our discs lose some of the fluid that helps them stay flexible. A herniated disc also may result from injuries to the spine, which may cause tiny tears or cracks in the outer layer (annulus or capsule) of the disc. The jellylike material (nucleus) inside the disc may be forced out through the tears or cracks in the capsule, which causes the disc to bulge, break open (rupture), or break into fragments.

Cervical Disc Herniation symptoms

Herniated discs in the neck (cervical spine) can cause pain, numbness, or weakness in the neck, shoulders, chest, arms, and hands. In some cases a very large herniated disc in the neck may cause weakness or unusual tingling affecting other parts of the body, including the legs.

Cervical Disc Herniation diagnose

A doctor usually can diagnose a herniated disc from your history of symptoms and a physical exam. Your doctor will ask about pain and numbness that might be caused by irritation of one or more of the nerves in the cervical spine. If your symptoms suggest a cervical herniated disc, rest and rehabilitation (rehab) often are recommended before further testing is done. If other conditions are suspected, or if there is no improvement in symptoms after a period of rest and rehab, imaging tests such as X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or computerized tomography (CT scan) may be done.

Cervical Disc Herniation treatment

In most cases, cervical herniated discs are first treated with nonsurgical treatment, including rest or modified activities, medicines to relieve pain and inflammation, and exercises, as recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may recommend that you see a physical therapist to learn how to do exercises and protect your neck, and perhaps for other treatment such as traction. Traction is gentle, steady pulling on the head to stretch the neck and allow the small joints between the neck bones to spread a little. If symptoms continue, your doctor may try stronger medicine such as corticosteroids. Symptoms usually improve over time. But if the herniated disc is squeezing your spinal cord or nerves and/or you are having weakness, constant pain, or decreased control of your bladder or bowels, surgery will be considered. In rare cases, an artificial disc may be used to replace the disc that is removed.

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